Tokyo Disneyland

ImageTokyo Disneyland was much the same as Disney World in Florida (I’ve never been to California’s Disneyland, so I can’t compare). It was comfortable to navigate, even without Japanese; all sales transactions and the like were handled with ease. I didn’t have any sort of issues/emergencies, so I don’t know how well equipped they are to handle something like that in a foreign language, but I imagine they’re at least competent. 

The rides and attractions were largely the same as at Disney World. There were a few differences: There’s a Western Land “Shooting Gallery” (I didn’t go to this), a Westernland Picture Parlor, where you can dress up in western style outfits (Western here meaning cowboys and such), Pinnochio’s Daring Journey (also skipped this…I think it’s along the same type of track ride as Snow White’s Adventures or Peter Pan’s Flight), Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin (a kid ride, skipped it), Chip n Dale’s Treehouse (a house for kids to climb through),  Donald’s Boat (similar, for children), Goofy’s Paint n Play House (Also skipped this, it’s in Toontown…the description says, “Use the special paint applicators to help Goofy redecorate the room”, I’m not sure what that actually entails, but I bet it’s not as fun as it sounds), Monsters Inc. Hide and Go Seek (skipped), Captain EO…a 3D Michael Jackson film, SKIPPED, and Star Jets, in which you ride a rocket very slowly in a circle, and you can control how high or low you fly. There’s also a kids’ roller coaster in Toontown called Gadget’s Go Coaster, that was quite fun. It’s a kiddie coaster, but it’s fast and fun with a lot of dips and quick turns. 

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Some attractions/shows are available with English subtitles, but most aren’t. I went to see Mickey’s Philharmagic 3D, a show with a lot of classic Disney songs weaved throughout the show. It was actually really interesting and enjoyable to hear those songs in Japanese, and Mickey’s “Arigatoo, arigatoo” at the end of the show was super cute. 

I would say the largest difference is the food selection. Food here is quite Japanese…expect to be a little disappointed by the churros at the food stalls, expect strange flavors of popcorn (curry, for example), the pizza is Japanese-style, there are spring roll carts, etc. There is some Western food available also, but from what I ate while I was there…don’t expect it to taste like normal American food. 

Another difference is the souvenirs which are offered. They’re, again, mostly the same, but there are a few things that specify “Tokyo Disneyland” on them, or seem to be specifically Japanese. For instance, there are floor cushions for sale (which Japanese people use to sit on tatami floors), key chains with Mickey and Minnie in kimonos, school folders which show Minnie dressed up geisha-style, handkerchiefs with Japanese patterns on them, etc. 

I’d pretty much always recommend a trip to Disney, to anyone. It’s the happiest place ever, after all. The staff at Tokyo Disneyland and the experience itself were wholly pleasant. Everyone was very polite and happy. The lines were long, but not what I would classify as insane. I went on a weekend in summer, and it was comparable to a day at Disney World during spring break (but it wasn’t as bad as Easter Sunday). If you want to go to Tokyo Disneyland during a summer weekend, I’d definitely recommend grabbing Fastpasses ASAP for whichever rides/attractions are a priority for you.

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One response

  1. Ben

    You forgot to mention Pooh’s Hunny Hunt, which is vastly different from its American counterparts and usually everyone’s favorite ride at TDL. Plus, as I went to Disney’s California Adventure recently, I noticed how much better the Monsters Inc. ride is in Tokyo. The animatronics are on an entirely different level. It’s glaringly obvious how little effort DCA put in by comparison… Also, the American parks don’t have the Queen of Hearts Banquet Hall.

    11/15/2013 at 1:05 pm

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